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Understanding the Essence of Protocol
John E. Johnson Offline
#1 Posted : Thursday, June 2, 2011 11:20:04 PM(UTC)
skywardgroup01


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What is a protocol?
A protocol is a study plan on which all clinical trials are based. The plan is carefully designed to safeguard the health of the participants as well as answer specific research questions. A protocol describes what types of people may participate in the trial; the schedule of tests, procedures, medications, and dosages; and the length of the study. While in a clinical trial, participants following a protocol are seen regularly by the research staff to monitor their health and to determine the safety and effectiveness of their treatment.

Angel
1 user thanked John E. Johnson for this useful post.
Mason on 6/4/2011(UTC)
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Mason Offline
#2 Posted : Saturday, June 4, 2011 6:09:24 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: John E. Johnson Go to Quoted Post
What is a protocol?
A protocol is a study plan on which all clinical trials are based. The plan is carefully designed to safeguard the health of the participants as well as answer specific research questions. A protocol describes what types of people may participate in the trial; the schedule of tests, procedures, medications, and dosages; and the length of the study. While in a clinical trial, participants following a protocol are seen regularly by the research staff to monitor their health and to determine the safety and effectiveness of their treatment.

Angel

Hi John,

It was very interesting to read that. I got a dual feeling about your posting. On one hand, it's good to get some kind of plan to follow. On the other hand, having a plan usualy means that people usually stop thinking, they just follow it. I remember a school music teacher giving an open lesson to all the parents of the class. It's a bad example for thsi case you know, but I remember how she was holding a list of items to do and she was very nervous trying to do them one by one, step by step. To be honest, it looked weird. She didn't care of kids so much as she did care of her plan.

It's good when you need to teach a beginner to do something and do that well. For this particular cases having a plan is much better than having nothing. Example? Mc Donalds, of course! I heard that they have all the plans printed as one huge manual for all employees and everyone working for McDonalds knows what to do and when exactly. "Take this spoon, turn around, drop it there, mix that, bake this, this is the temperature and time, etc." That's why their food is so consistently stable. They developed a standard for everything, and that's probably the best way to go for them because they usually hire very young people who had no any idea about food market and cooking before in their entire life. That's why you can find directions everywhere including bathrooms. Something like "Every employee must wash hands before return to the job". You got the idea. Applause I'd honestly prefer them to act this way of course. People coming to get a burger expect same quality and quantity at any location in the world, and that's their power. But, if we talk about human body and doctors, it's very hard to create a universal plan that will be good for everyone. The medical conditions, the body shape, the food priorities, way of life, finally region, etc., etc. can be very different. And I've heard about many examples when people got nothing to do if there is something unusual that doesn't get into the existing plans.

I realize that having a plan is much easier in most situations. If something serious happens people have no time to think, they just know what they should do in this particular case. If the worst happens then people will know what part of the plan was missing, skipped, or went wrong.

I'm sure there are a lot of different valuable ideas that can be discussed here. I just gave you a few from the top of my head.

Regards,
Mason
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Paula on 6/4/2011(UTC)
Paula Offline
#3 Posted : Saturday, June 4, 2011 7:21:35 PM(UTC)
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I totally agree with you. it's very complicated to judge about it in just a few words. I remember my EX- family doctor that I visited a long time ago and never again. It was a pretty close office from my home, I didn't find anything bad about him on the Internet, and when I got sick I decided to visit him. First impression - he even didn't know how to use a stethoscope! "But he is a doctor" I thought! I had caught and wanted him to help me. He prescribed something, but mentioned that his entire office has this kind of caught and he cannot do anything about it. Well, he charged me anyway even knowing that he and his service are worthless and will not help. Never again. I'm not gonna support such a doctor with my wallet, not me, sorry!

What did I start with? Protocol? Yes. After "using" his stethoscope and making very smart face he looked at his computer, obviously didn't find anything to be used in this particular case. He didn't send me for a further medical examination, blood test, X-Ray. The caught was terrible and he didn't actually care. He just charged me over $120 for his smile and his stethoscope show. I wish I had a hidden camera with me because nobody would believe me if I told how he was using this very complicated device. So for these people the Protocol is the only one way to survive, because they know nothing about what they are doing. Sorry for this terrible example, but it's truth. I'm not publishing the name and address for an obvious reason.
Paula
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